Methamphetamine: you didn’t forget about it, did you?

Because customs authority sure hasn’t. In 2016, San Diego seized 10 times the amount of meth they had in 2006. Arizona, California, and Texas seized 24 times as much.

Manufacturers have perfected the product. At $5 a hit with almost 100% purity, it’s infiltrating the drug world. Users can’t resist the cheap price, feel-good high, and purity.

And with that comes a whirlwind of terrible meth addiction symptoms. The stereotype is true. Meth mouth, bugs under the skin–and that’s only the surface.

If you or a loved one have hit rock bottom, don’t worry. That means it’s time to look up and crawl out of the black hole. Recovery is possible.

Here’s the information you need to fight this disease.

Methamphetamine Use: Sobering Statistics

Meth addiction is impacting our society in dangerous ways right here, right now.

And although the opioid crisis is a battle worth fighting–it’s overshadowed the impact of meth use in society. These startling stats get buried in the process.

The New York Times offers more info about meth’s negative impact on the United States.

  • About 6,000 people died from meth use in 2015–a 255% increase from a decade before
  • In the past five years, the amount of meth seized has tripled
  • Meth arrests have the highest correlation with other crimes
  • Over 1/5 of burglaries and 40% of car theft also involved meth arrests in Portland, Oregon
  • People dying from meth use in Oregon double that of heroin deaths
  • Meth violations have more than tripled in Montana
  • Meth is the #1 drug-related cause of death in Oklahoma–by a long shot
  • Meth is the drug of choice for people ages 50+ in Hawaii
  • South Dakota has now called meth an epidemic

These statistics do nothing but prove that the use of meth is no good, even as related to the choice of drug. Because of the surge of energy that comes with using, users are more likely to stay up all night.

And they need something to do with their time and lack of money or drugs.

Burglaries are more common in areas where meth use is rampant. Unlike downers, meth instills the need for speed, activity–hence one of its nicknames, “speed.”

Meth is commonly used in combination with heroin. If not for combating its energizing effects–then because heroin users like the price and purity of meth. Eighty-ninety percent of heroin abusers also use meth.

What symptoms are these users experiencing?

Meth Addiction Symptoms Pt. I

Symptoms range from physical, to physiological, to mental and behavioral. Meth has the capacity and the ability to affect many–if not all–parts of the body and mind.

Meth has many adverse effects on the body, some worse than others. You’re dealing with more than physical deterioration. Meth can bring on a slew of issues–even increased risk of stroke in younger people.

Those under the age of 45 suffer a great risk when using. Recent research shows that 8 out of 10 strokes caused by meth use were hemorrhagic–or from a bleed in the brain. Risk of death is higher from this type of stroke by almost 1/3.

Men are twice as likely to succumb to this symptom.

Clear signs of meth addiction lay in the behavior of the user. Meth causes erratic behavior and obsession with performing tasks. Users are frequently seen cleaning, washing their hands, assembling and disassembling tasks over and over again.

Apply this behavior to everything and you’ve got an idea of what meth does to daily activities.

Meth Addiction Symptoms Pt. II

Users begin to withdraw from activities which once brought them pleasure. Meth releases pleasure hormones–norepinephrine, dopamine, serotonin. And because of this, users have a hard time feeling happy when not using.

It increases negative behavior. Anything from increased criminal activity to a carefree sex life is not out of the question. Stealing from and lying to family members and friends. Obsessive-compulsive activity.

Withdrawal symptoms can be just as painful initially. Users experience an increase in their eating and drinking habits. There’s also the potential for depression, anxiety, and major drug cravings.

And when you get to the surface, it’s not too pretty there either. Users of meth experience sores, rotten teeth, weight loss. All the euphoria in the world can’t cover up the scratches and sores on a meth user’s body.

Exploring Treatment Options

The NY Times makes a sad point when it comes to the treatment options for meth users. Unlike opioids, there are fewer tools available for those suffering from meth addiction.

Opioid users have two effective options. Naloxone can reverse opioid overdoses in emergency situations. And Methadone helps users curb their drug craving.

Unfortunately for meth users, there is no magic overdose reversal pill. There is no way to ease off the drug with another pain reliever. So when you’re addicted, there’s a feeling of being stuck.

But that’s not the case.

One of the most common options for addicts? The well-known 12 Step Program, or Alcoholics Anonymous.

This involves relinquishing your problems and becoming the most humble version of oneself. The twelve steps allow addicts the chance to reflect, repent, and consult a higher power for help.

There are also options for different types of treatment centers.

Inpatient and outpatient detox centers. Inpatient and outpatient centers offer similar forms of treatment. But in outpatient, patients are able to live at home. Inpatient offers round-the-clock care and assistance.

Detox centers allow users a place to withdraw from drugs in a safe environment. They are free of easy temptation and offer on-site care from professionals.

Depending on the level of addiction, users may be able to get away with therapy or support groups alone.

Sobriety Is Worth It

Meth addiction symptoms don’t last forever if we don’t allow them to. Addiction is a battle worth fighting. Underneath it all, the pre-addict self is still alive.

And it wants to thrive.

If you or a loved one is considering treatment options, that’s a huge first step. The next step is to call the Sublime Wellness Center at (949)-259-5214. All you need is yourself and a week’s worth of clothes to make a major change.